My Booklist

Must Read

  • House to House

    House to House

    by David Bellavia Year Published: Average
    From Publishers Weekly Staff sergeant Bellavia's account of the fierce 2004 fighting in Fallujah will satisfy readers who like their testosterone undiluted. Portraying himself as a hard-bitten, foul-mouthed, superbly trained warrior, deeply in love with America and the men in his unit, contemptuous of liberals and a U.S. media that fails to support soldiers fighting in the front lines of the global war on terror, Bellavia begins with a nasty urban shootout against Shiite insurgent militias. Six months later, his unit prepares to assault the massively fortified city of Fallujah in a ferocious battle that takes up the rest of the book. Anyone expecting an overview of strategy or political background to the war has picked the wrong book. Bellavia writes a precise, hour-by-hour account of the fighting, featuring repeated heroic feats and brave sacrifice from Americans but none from the enemy, contemptuously dismissed as drug-addled, suicidal maniacs. Readers will encounter a nuts-and-bolts description of weapons, house-to-house tactics, gallantry and tragic mistakes, culminating with a glorious victory that, in Bellavia's view, will go down in history with the invasion of Normandy. Like a pitch-by-pitch record of a baseball game, this detailed battle description will fascinate enthusiasts and bore everyone else.

    Note: This book is available in our Library.
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  • Lone Survivor: The Eyewitness Account of Operation

    Lone Survivor: The Eyewitness Account of Operation Redwing and the Lost Heroes of SEAL Team 10

    by Marcus Luttrell Year Published: Average
    From The Washington Post If you're looking for a true story that showcases both American heroism and Afghani humanity, Marcus Luttrell's Lone Survivor: The Eyewitness Account of Operation Redwing and the Lost Heroes of SEAL Team 10 (Little, Brown, $24.99), written with Patrick Robinson, may be the book for you. In June of 2005, Luttrell led a four-man team of Navy SEALs into the mountains of Afghanistan on a mission to kill a Taliban leader thought to be allied with Osama bin Laden. On foot, the team encountered two adult men and a teenage boy. A debate broke out as to whether the SEALs should summarily execute the trio to keep them from alerting the Taliban. Luttrell himself was called upon to make the decision. He was torn between considerations of morality and his survival instinct, and he points out that "any government that thinks war is somehow fair and subject to rules like a baseball game probably should not get into one. Because nothing's fair in war, and occasionally the wrong people do get killed."

    Note: This book is available in our Library.
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  • Theodore Rex

    Theodore Rex

    by Edmund Morris Year Published: Challenging
    In this lively biography, Edmund Morris returns to the gifted, energetic, and thoroughly controversial man whom the novelist Henry James called "King Theodore." In his two terms as president of the United States, Roosevelt forged an American empire, and he behaved as if it was his destiny. In this sequel to his Pulitzer Prize-winning biography The Rise of Theodore Roosevelt, Morris charts Roosevelt's accomplishments: the acquisition of the Panama Canal and the Philippines, the creation of national parks and monuments, and more. "Collaring Capital and Labor in either hand," Morris writes, Roosevelt made few friends, but he usually got what he wanted--and earned an enduring place in history.

    Note: This book is available in our Library.
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  • Theodore Roosevelt: A Life

    Theodore Roosevelt: A Life

    by Nathan Miller Year Published: Average
    From Publishers Weekly Theodore Roosevelt (1858-1919) was the first president to make the federal goverment rectify harsh social and economic conditions. It was during his administration (1901-1909) that the U.S. was transformed from a provincial nation on the fringes of global affairs into a world power. Those are key contentions of this first-rate biography, in which Miller ( FDR: An Intimate History ) covers the political accomplishments and personal facets of this prismatic figure--politician, statesman, soldier, conservationist, historian, biographer, adventurer. What distinguishes this biography from others is its concentration on TR's relations with his close associates and his family, particularly his first and second wives (Miller is the first biographer to make extensive use of Roosevelt's courtship letters). Here is Teddy Roosevelt in three dimensions: ardent, inexhaustibly vital and astonishingly versatile.

    Note: This book is available in our Library.
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  • What You Should Know About Politics... But Don't:

    What You Should Know About Politics... But Don't: A Nonpartisan Guide to the Issues

    by Jessamyn Conrad Year Published: Average
    What You Should Know About Politics . . . But Don’t breaks it all down, issue by issue, explaining who stands for what, and why—whether it’s the economy, the war in Iraq, health care, oil and renewable energy sources, or climate change. If you’re a Democrat, a Republican, or somewhere in between, it’s the perfect book to brush up on a single topic or read through to get a deeper understanding of the often-mucky world of American politics.

    Note: This book is available in our Library.
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